dynamicafrica:

Women of Toubou ethnicity.

Toubou people live mostly in Chad, Niger and southern Libya where they are a minority and, under Gaddafi’s rule, suffered high rates of discrimination where those living in Libya where stripped of their citizenship by Gaddafi who claimed they were not Libyans, but Chadians. They were also denied access to resources such as healthcare and education by local authorities in Libya.

During the Libyan revolution of 2011, the Toubou sided with anti-Gaddafi forces, and in 2012, they clashed and fought against Arab fighters in the southern city of Sabha, Libya. Toubou leaders and activists have spoken out about these tensions saying that the persecution Toubou people face is a form of ‘ethnic cleansing’.

deducecanoe:

leseanthomas:

With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black children than anywhere else in the world, Taofick Okoya was dismayed when he could not find a black doll for his niece.

The 43-year-old spotted a gap in the market and, with little competition from foreign firms such as Mattel Inc, the maker of Barbie, he set up his own business. He outsourced manufacturing of doll parts to low-cost China, assembled them onshore and added a twist – traditional Nigerian costumes.

The dolls represent Nigeria’s three largest Ethnic Groups; Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba so far.

Seven years on, Okoya sells between 6,000 and 9,000 of his Queens of Africa and Naija Princesses a month, and reckons he has 10-15% of a small but fast-growing market.

"I like it," says Ifunanya Odiah, five, struggling to contain her excitement as she inspects one of Okoya’s dolls in a Lagos shopping mall. "It’s black, like me.”

Like Barbies, Okoya’s dolls are slim, despite the fact that much of Africa abhors the western ideal of stick-thin models. Okoya says his early templates were larger bodied, and the kids did not like them.

But he hopes to change that. “For now, we have to hide behind the ‘normal’ doll. Once we’ve built the brand, we can make dolls with bigger bodies.”

SOURCE: http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/jan/15/barbie-nigeria-queen-africa-dolls-mattel-toymaker

This is so cool.

(via beautiesofafrique)

misdeeds:

Ooooop. Here’s a little something to celebrate Miss Yuna hittin a milli on Twitter. Guess there’s gonna be a million people that will be seeing random photos of flowers on their timeline now. Look at how bawsey she looks. psshh.


Say that~

misdeeds:

Ooooop. Here’s a little something to celebrate Miss Yuna hittin a milli on Twitter. Guess there’s gonna be a million people that will be seeing random photos of flowers on their timeline now. Look at how bawsey she looks. psshh.

Say that~

(via yunamusic)

lotusislove:

got2boshun:

beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: The Fulani people

Fulani people are one of the largest ethnolinguistic groups in Africa, numbering approximately 40 million people in total. They form one of the most widely dispersed and culturally diverse of the peoples of Africa. The Fulani are bound together by the common language of Fulfulde, as well as by some basic elements of Fulbe culture, such as The pulaaku , a code of conduct common to all Fulani groups. The Wodaabe (Fula: Woɗaaɓe) or Bororo and Toroobe are small subgroups of the Fulani ethnic group.

African countries where they are present include Mauritania, Ghana, Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Benin, Burkina Faso, Guinea Bissau, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Chad, Togo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan the Central African Republic, Liberia, and as far East as the Red Sea in Sudan and Egypt. With the exception of Guinea, where the Fula make up an ethnic plurality (largest single ethnic group) or approximately 40%+ of the population, Fulas are minorities in every country they live in. So, most also speak other dominant languages of the countries they inhabit, making many Fulani bilingual or even trilingual in nature. Such languages include Hausa, Bambara, Wolof, Arabic, 

Historically, the Fulani played a significant role in the rise and fall of ancient African empires such as Ghana, Mali, Songhai and the Mossi states. They greatly contributed to the spread of Islam throughout Western Africa. More recently, slavery and colonialism dispersed Fulani throughout the Middle East, the Americas and Europe. 

Fulani people were among the first Africans to convert to Islam. Between the eighth and the fourteenth century, Fulbe-speaking people of Takrur had produced a class of Muslim clerics, the Torodbe, who would take on proselytizing activities across the entire western Sudan. Increasingly, the memory of their previous pastoral religion was lost, except in some sub-groups such as the Bororo or Wodaabe (i.e., “Isolated”), who remained animists and nomads. Between the eleventh and the seventeenth century, the Fulbe gradually extended their grazing territory from over much of the West African savanna up to Borno. They usually took no part in the political life of the surrounding entities, and were sometimes subjected to heavy taxes.

Read more/ Source 1| 2| 3| 4

I’m always told I look Fulani

My maternal ancestry!!!!!!! Just found this info recently!!! They so/We so beautiful tho!!!!!!!!!!! #egun thank you

(via beautiesofafrique)